How Bout Them Hawkeyes

How Bout Them Hawkeyes – Twitter has become the outlet for Iowa football’s biggest fans and its biggest critics, changing the way players approach the sport.

Tailgating is always a highlight of the Hawkeye football Saturday experience. But for some, this old tradition has taken a new turn. Greg Suckow – better known as Hawkeye Elvis – regularly tailgates in the Melrose neighborhood on Iowa football game days. He can often be seen decked out in the iconic costume his mother made in 2010, which he first wore to a Halloween game at Kinnick Stadium. It has gained a cult following since its inception, especially in social media where it has amassed over 6,500 Twitter followers in the past few years. What he didn’t want was to find some of his best memories through explanation. “Everybody I live with in my Melrose place, I’ve met them all on Twitter,” he said. “I had to friend them on Twitter. They will follow me, and finally we will meet in person and just meet. “The map he leaves in his head, Suckow rattles off the neighbors of his weekly competition, with their Twitter activities: MamaHawk and ‘Katie Jo’ – who has 4,236 Twitter followers – most tailgate across the street, while IHawkeye – who has added 1,186. followers — parks on it. Twitter has flipped the whole concept of football fandom on its head, and that’s important of it all is in Iowa City. Every year, a data-analytics research company publishes statistics about social media. In 2017, it was found that of all the tweets about TV per week, about a third of them happened on Sunday during the NFL season. A study last year found that 50 percent of all tweets about TV related to sports. Sports fans are entering the online space. There nt There are hundreds, if not thousands of anonymous, Iowa-centric accounts dotting Twitter, but only a few of them have gained a significant following. Popular, anonymous accounts — having found a niche by making jokes about Hawkeye football — have followed the crowd. Along with the group of Melrose tailgaters, anonymous accounts like Hawkize, PlannedSickDays, and Irrational Hawkeye also broke out. These three people have a total of more than 33,400. Hawkeye’s absurd account first appeared in March of 2013, and has been active ever since. But the shout out from PlannedSickDays – which has had a huge impact over the years – has earned IrrationalHawkeye a wider fan base. “I play on Twitter and have my own account for personal stuff, and tweet a lot about the Hawkeyes,” said Irrational Hawkeye, who prefers to be known by his handle. “But I realized that the people who probably followed me didn’t really care about [that]. When I looked around, I realized that there was a community of whack-jobs like me out there. The make-up of football fans has changed completely in the last decade, with ‘work whack’ hanging up the shirt and ditching the face paint on the phone and the Twitter password. Some of the biggest Hawkeye fans are on Twitter today, and their tweet volume and popularity prove it. Meanwhile, Hawkize, PlannedSickDays, and Irrational Hawkeye were at their peak during Iowa’s nationally televised matchup with Penn State on October 12. Together, the accounts were tweeted 158 times, garnering 4,047 total hits. These big ideas flooding the online world of gaming have led to some fun for Iowa-centric money. Hawkeye’s controversial comments to Northwestern even warranted a ban from Wildcat head coach Pat Fitzgerald. “I don’t remember which [tweet] it was because I wasn’t paying attention, but I found it funny,” Irrational Hawkeye said. “The two that I know for sure blocked me were Fitzgerald and Dan Dakich, and I know I sent a lot of trash to Dan Dakich.”

How Bout Them Hawkeyes

How Bout Them Hawkeyes

The humor of such people is definitely the norm in social media. Sometimes, the recipient of the joke gets caught up in it and just presses the block button. But in college sports in particular, criticism of student-athletes has become something else, and has almost become an epidemic that many feel is endemic. dangerous. Even within the Iowa fan base — which prides itself on Midwestern values ​​and being “Iowa Great” — fans on Twitter have shown some negative aspects of football fandom. Meanwhile, quarterback Nate Stanley — despite being tied for second in Iowa history in passing yards — made much of it through anonymous money. “Of course we are disappointed in the game and the result, but some of the tweets I have seen tell the players, not only in Iowa but everywhere, that there is no hope,” said Irrational Hawkeye. “I think there is no need. But the truth is that these words are words that people do in their homes or in the market, and they do it as long as there is a game. It’s just that now there’s an outlet for insanity 24/7 Criticism this season of Stanley, offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz, and the Hawkeye offense has reached new heights after Iowa’s third loss of season for Wisconsin last week. The team scored six points in three quarters at Camp Randall Stadium, falling to No. 85 in total offense in the FBS. Stanley still went 17-for-28 and lost two touchdowns, but apparently, many fans on Twitter wanted a longer bridge for the three-year starter, who took a lot of hits. on social media for the season no. “People are entitled to their opinions,” said Stanley despite Michigan’s loss. “I’ve said it before, but if j think you can’t get bad comments, you’re wrong… I’m getting better even without paying much attention. But it’s always visible. in a bit.” This negative effect of Twitter use has led to many programs banning student-athletes from maintaining Twitter accounts, and this includes the Hawkeye football program. However however, some college coaches have successfully controlled their players, A bad example of this happened in 2015, when former Texas coach Charlie Strong faced conflict between his players after the team got off to a 1-4 start. his freshman teammates, who later took to Twitter to defend themselves and later. Freshman Charles Omenihu fired back at Haines in a tweet, suggesting that Haines should “think before you speak.” The tweet-out climaxed with freshman Kris Boyd retweeting a message that suggested he wanted to transfer from the program. at the time head coach Kirk Ferentz spoke about his no-Twitter policy aj directly after the event. “I just read a lot of things here where a guy tweets something or puts it out in public and then four hours later this problem is good, long, detailed sorry that others write for them,” he said. “Often a little unfair. I do not want to see one of our men in that situation, because most of what they say is not actionable, and most of the following is not very flattering. This rule has been in existence today, as the use of Twitter has increased dramatically. Remarkably, the Hawkeye men’s basketball team also allows its players to tweet during the season. However, now Iowa football fans are seeing the value in shutting down the internet noise. “We just want to focus on us and the voices in this house, and not focus on what people are saying about us [on Twitter], good or bad,” second baseman Jack Koerner said. said. More than protecting the football mentality of these college athletes, it has become important to ensure that their health is strong enough to deal with online criticism . Just a few weeks ago, Cleveland Browns’ Jermaine Whitehead was subjected to so much self-criticism, that it went to such an extreme and disgusting level that it led to his release. “It’s one thing to love the program and be a fan of it, but man, when you start going up against these guys, it’s crazy,” Suckow said. “And I think that’s where Kirk is so smart to keep these guys on Twitter, not for their ability to focus, but for their own health, so they don’t have to listen people criticize them.” But the Hawkeye fan remains pure in many ways on social media, still raving about his rival Nebraska and discussing Iowa’s recruiting efforts. Last Nov. 2, Irrational Hawkeye brought that forward, remembering the Cornhuskers’ loss

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